Picasso, Gauguin and Seth

As I savor my time with Picasso, I find myself digressing a little to think about how he allows for thick lines to carry the expressiveness of some of his earlier work. Ex, Harlequin and His Companion or The Two Saltimbanques. He refines this later on, as he becomes more abstract, but even in his […]

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Sirens

I am currently reading Picasso: The Early Years (1892-1906), by Marilyn McCully. I haven’t had time to dive into it yet. Eh, other creative endeavors, life, etc. In the mean time, I’ll leave you with another response to Picasso. —- I was reading The Ultimate Picasso, by Brigitte Leal, et. al. and I had just […]

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First Impressions of Picasso

The first works by Picasso I considered were from his Cubist paintings, but the only response I could muster was one of intrigue accompanied by very few words. The first works which elicited some opinion of what I was seeing were paintings from his Blue Period, which was much more straightforward and obvious. It is […]

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But is it art? (Part 3)

Continued from But is it art? (Part 2) Art and Money With the evaluation of art comes an implied hierarchy. We not only see it in the buying and selling of art but in museums as well. This draws up the question, What makes “good art?” What accounts for the differences in value? Freeland does […]

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But is it art? (Part 2)

The following is a long and meandering book response to But is it art? (2002) by Cynthia Freeland. 256 pages. I’ve read this book once.  The title is a rhetorical question. It is a challenge, and Freeland answers the challenge by illustrating how the very definition of “art” varies between eras and cultures, and thus, shows us […]

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But is it art? (Part 1)

The following is from my post, “What’s the big idea?” You may think these ideas are unimportant when it comes to actually producing works of art, but I think having an idea of what one believes is beautiful is at the heart of one’s approach to one’s own work. I know, this view is very […]

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New Year’s Resolution

Over the years, I have amassed over 420 books. I buy some, I trade some. I’ve actually sold a few I’d purchased on Amazon back to Amazon buyers for cash (via the link where you don’t see who the buyer is) and then a few years later bought the exact same books back. I have […]

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Line and Essence

Lately, I’ve been looking at some really big ideas. I’d like to focus in on the practice of drawing again, specifically, the work that lines do. I noted an “airiness” in my “Zen drawings” in my post, “The Paradox of Zen Drawing,” a characteristic not shared by all line drawings. How did I achieve this “airiness, […]

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What’s the big idea?

The following is a continuation of two previous posts: Zen Seeing, Zen Drawing (1993) and The Paradox of Zen Drawing.   Ideas are human constructs, but where do we get our ideas, from within oneself or from beyond oneself; and if from within oneself, is it arbitrary?  It’s easy to make distinctions between occurrences which involve […]

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The Paradox of Zen Drawing

I want to continue a couple of threads I left hanging in my last post,  Zen Seeing, Zen Drawing. (Anything in blockquotes is from that post.)  Franck anticipated that “Fundamentalist Zenists may… question [Zen Drawing’s] validity as Zen practice.” (p. 25) I glossed over this because Franck doesn’t address this question directly. He only continues to […]

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