Flowers II (2020)

I started Flowers II in 2018. I didn’t like how I painted the flowers, initially, so I did some editing. Then, when I was [overwhelmingly] happy with the flowers, I wasn’t sure how to paint the vases. I was a wee bit nervous about getting the colors wrong so I decided to put it off to the side and wait for myself to calm down.

For a brief moment in 2019, I had the idea of painting the vases in monochrome, specifically, with Lipton Tea.

I first made a master copy of the outline of the flowers and vases. I then planned out which parts would have how many layers of tea. The more layers the darker. I used Frog tape to cover the areas that would be lighter than other areas and then removed the Frog tape one set of areas at a time, as I applied more and more washes of tea.

I may have given certain areas a bit too much tea because a part of the surface, at the bottom, has spots. Moreover, with so much tea, the Frog tape let some of the tea seep under the edges so the lines it created weren’t very clean.

I want to say that helped take the pressure off of not “ruining” the work, but I still wasn’t sure how to do what I did for the flowers as I might for the vases.

This last week, I finally said F*** it and stuck to the most obvious choices. (I had to let go of the ambition to go beyond what I was already doing and to just complete what I’ve started.)

I first aimed to make it look like the original, so the only change would’ve been the flowers. But, using watercolor pencils, I couldn’t find the right combination of colors to have the same color scheme. Eventually, I realized I wasn’t thinking about the wash I’d made with the tea. It goes very well with the red of the flowers but it also makes the entire color scheme more somber or “rustic.” (The original Flowers II has no wash so the background is bright white and the color scheme is bright and cheerful.)

Going through so many sketches, I could also see the benefit of having a lighter hand. (It’s more delicate and makes the vases more of a supporting element for the flowers.) I decided to use each color twice, making it either lighter and more transparent or darker and more opaque.

To make it lighter, I applied the pencil lightly over the surface and then wet the brush without dabbing it (much) to give the area a wash, and then dabbed the area dry with a towel. To make it darker, I applied the pencil more heavily. I also wet the brush and then swiped it across a dry towel before applying it to the area.

Once I had an idea of what the colors would be for a single vase, I used the carbon copy I made in 2018 to produce the outlines for a study that included all the vases.

I used the following colors from a set of 72 watercolor pencils by Arteza: Lime Green (a600), Pear Green (a603), Shamrock Green (a605) and Fern Green (a612).

Flowers II (2020) 18″ x 24″ Ink, water color and tea on paper

There’s a small part of me that wants to color in the centers of the flowers on the top row to follow through with what I was doing with the tea. But … It might make the work a little off balance and make me inclined to add a leaf on the left side. Or I may be over thinking it and should just be happy with what I have.

Influences

I was thinking mostly of Joan Miro’s The Poetess and other similar works. But I’ve been browsing Saatchi’s website and, clicking on the subsequent ads that show up in my hotmail account, I discovered Ebru Acar Taralp, who has a style that seems to be very similar to what I’m doing with Flowers II (and Trees). There’s also green composition by Rafa Mateo.

I want to say I’ve seen a couple of other artists making it a part of what they’re doing, but I don’t remember their names. Well, all this to say, It must be a thing.

Notes on Editing: Flowers II (Part III)

Whenever I get “blocked” (think “writer’s block” but for artists), it’s psychological. I mean it’s not because I’ve inexplicably run out of ideas. It’s usually something else entirely. I’m distracted or… well, it’s usually because I’m distracted, but for a variety of reasons.

Maybe I was looking at Michelangelo too much… but I kept getting the feeling that I was primed to make a mistake, and I just didn’t want to botch something that could look so awesome. Which is absurd at my age… to buckle under some imaginary pressure to do well.

Or the pressure was real but not because of the work itself. It was pressure from just wanting to do it well. Have you ever watched Breakfast at Tiffany’s with Audrey Hepburn, when Holly Golightly starts going on about the “mean reds?” I can’t say it was as dramatic as that, but I was responding to something outside of what I was working on and the work is what suffered.

Not sure where this falls under the bell curve… but I’m better now. I put it aside for Christmas and New Year’s… and on… and then said, f*** it, and started going at it again.

I decided to keep doing what I had already been doing, which I had told myself not to do for fear of making the drawing look too simple. To my surprise, it does not look too simple.

Moreover, while seeing something that works take shape, I began to see the why’s and how’s behind how it works.

VS Michelangelo’s Study of a Mourning Woman (SOMW)

 

I had done a few studies with the ambition of making my flowers look as cool as SOMW.  I tried to apply the technique, above, and although I succeeded with the petal that points towards the left (fourth flower, below), I can’t say the same for the petals that are vertical.  Only when I reverted back to doing what I did for the first set of flowers (the drooping ones), did I realize the ambition to look like SOMW was a major part of what “blocked” me.

 

Michelangelo was probably looking at a real live woman, so his ambition was to draw her realistically. On the other hand, it’s not perfectly realistic; IE, there are some “short cuts” or places that don’t require as much detail because other places deserve more attention. These “short cuts” are abstractions  and involve choices having to do with style.

Choosing the balance between realism and abstraction can be a very conscious choice (especially if you’re like me and over-analyze everything).

My Flowers (1) are a product of my imagination and (2) I began with outlines, so my end goal must be an abstraction or much more of one than SOMW. To finish Flowers, I had to decide on the style of lines and follow through with that style. I had to decide on “doing more of the same,” regardless of my fears of ending up with a “simple drawing.”

Flowers II 011319.JPG

People believe SOMW was an early drawing of Michelangelo’s. He was doing what many others were already doing. He just did it extremely well. He had good lines and kept them evenly spaced apart, which yielded great visual rhythm.

My Flowers also rely heavily on visual rhythm. The technique is simple, but it relies on me doing it well. It’s a matter of having good eyes and good hands. and has manifested, thus far, from what was already there, organically.

 

To be continued…